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The First Video Games in History
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The First Video Games in History

by Khirol HazwanFebruary 15, 2017

Over the years, technological devices – including the best consumer electronics in the Philippines and across the world – have gone through significant changes. Obviously, many developments occurred for this to happen, which resulted to various tech companies like Apple, Microsoft, IBM, and others stepping up their game to impress buyers from everywhere.

First video games in history

First video games in history

All these advancements, of course, had to come from something. After all, every success story originates from humble beginnings. For instance, the video games children play today is so far off from the ones that had been made back in the days.

Let’s go ahead and revisit the first video games ever created in history. Here they are now:

Bertie the Brain

Bertie the Brain

Photo Courtesy: teamingame.gr

Bertie the Brain was created by Josef Kates in order to showcase his invention the addriton tube. Basically, it was a tinier version of the vacuum tube. He presented them to the Canadian National Exhibition back in the year 1950.

Attendees at the exhibition were able to play a huge game of tic-tac-toe on a computer that is four meters long. They played against an artificial intelligence using a keypad with a three-by-three grid. They were able to adjust the difficulty level, which added a whole new challenge to the game.

Unfortunately, the game had been forgotten shortly after, especially since the addriton tube was not used for anything else. It is believed, however, that this is the first video game to offer a visual display to the players.

Nim

Nim

Photo Courtesy: oldschoolgames.ca

Traditionally, Nim is a “real life” game that uses mathematical strategy. Its objective is to have two people play against each other. They will be taking turns removing objects from distinct racks. To win the game, they have to be the person to remove the last object.

Nimrod

Photo Courtesy: theToyChannel/youtube.com

In May 5, 1951, Ferranti – a nascent computer developer and an engineering firm – created the so-called Nimrod computer and presented it in

the Festival of Britain. They essentially designed it to play a digital game of Nim. Players had to press certain buttons, which correspond with lights (or objects) on the board. They were given the choice to play it traditionally or in reverse through a machine that is five feet tall, nine feet deep, and twelve feet wide.

Draughts

Photo Courtesy: garalperovitz.com

 

Just like Nim and tic-tac-toe, draughts is a traditional game played in real life. In fact, you might recognize it by its other name, checkers. Originally, it is intended to be played using a checkerboard. Individuals, who play this game, have to use strategy to win and outwit each other.

Christopher Strachey developed a computer simulation of draughts in 1952. Since then, it has been known as the very first video game that has been created for a general-purpose computer – unlike Bertie the Brain. However, it was Arthur Samuel, who successfully added the game’s artificial intelligence. He was able to do it in the year 1955.

These are the first three video games to have been created in history. Thanks to them and their makers, the current generation can play games that are out of this world – which makes you wonder what can happen in the future!

 

About the Author:

Carl Padilla

A lad who enjoys foodies, technologies, lifestyle, and adventures. I write to inspire and encourage. I enjoy and live every moment because laughter is timeless, imagination has no age, and dreams are forever.

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